Posts by Brianna Moland

Roundup: New Islands, New Bacteria, and New Maps

Posted by on Feb 6, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: New Islands, New Bacteria, and New Maps

Spread the News:ShareNew Islands, Bacteria, and Maps Retreating Coronation Glacier Forms New Deltaic Island From American Geophysical Union: “In 1989 Coronation Glacier (Nunavut, Canada) terminates where the main outlet stream has created a pair of small deltaic islands on the northern side of the fjord. In 2016 a new deltaic island has formed near the southern edge of the margin, indicating a shift in the position of the main river outlet emanating from below the glacier, this is also marked by a large plume. The island formed is larger than those observed in 1989 or 1998. The size of the island gives it potential to survive, based on satellite imagery. A visit to the island would be needed to shed light on its potential for enduring. Retreat from 1989 to 2016 has been 1100 meters on the northern side of the fjord and 500 meters on the south side of the fjord. The average retreat of 800 meters in 27 years is over 30 meters/year, much faster than the 1880-1988 period.” Read more about Coronation Glacier here.   Microbial Subglacial Communities in Greenland From Microbial Ecology: “The Watson River drains a portion of the southwest Greenland ice sheet, transporting microbial communities from subglacial environments to a delta at the head of Søndre Strømfjord. This study investigates the potential activity and community shifts of glacial microbiota deposited and buried under layers of sediments within the river delta. A long-term (12-month) incubation experiment was established using Watson River delta sediment under anaerobic conditions, with and without carbon dioxide/hydrogen enrichment. The results highlight the need for further investigations into the fate of subglacial microbiota within downstream environments.” Learn more about subglacial microbial communities here.   Improving Glacier Bed Topography Mapping From Oceanography: “Melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet has the potential to raise sea level by 7.36 meters and is already contributing to global sea level rise at a rate higher than 1 milimeter/year. Computer models are our best tools to make projections of the mass balance of Greenland over the next centuries, but these models rely on bed topography data that remain poorly constrained near glacier termini. We combine here for the first time mass conservation glacier bed mapping and newly collected bathymetry data from NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) to evaluate and improve descriptions of bed topography under grounded ice near glacier termini, where it matters most for improving the reliability of ice sheet models.” Read more about NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland data here.   Spread the...

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