Posts by Brianna Moland

Photo Friday: Icebergs at Berg Lake

Posted by on Jun 2, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images, Tourism | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Icebergs at Berg Lake

Spread the News:ShareLocated in Mount Robson Provincial Park in British Columbia, Canada, Berg Lake tends to be filled with icebergs throughout the year. Visitors often see ice break off or calve into the lake, which is partially fed by Berg Glacier. Known for its glacier, floating icebergs, and bright bluish-green water, the lake is a popular destination for hikers. Berg Glacier sits atop Mount Robson, the tallest peak in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Mount Robson is part of a sub-range of the Rocky Mountains known as the Rainbow Range. Named “Tsitsutl,” meaning “painted mountains” in the local dialect, Rainbow Range is made of lava and rock that comes in hues of red, orange, lavender and yellow, noticeable on sunny days. Mount Robson Provincial Park, including Berg Lake and Glacier, was designated a UNESCO world heritage site in 1990. For a visceral experience of the park, attend the 7th Annual Mount Robson Marathon to be held on September 9, 2017. The marathon will take runners up the world-renowned Berg Lake Trail. Below, you can find a video of hiker Phil Armitage on the trail.                   Spread the...

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Exploring Corporate Social Responsibility with KÜHL

Posted by on May 25, 2017 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Featured Posts | 1 comment

Exploring Corporate Social Responsibility with KÜHL

Spread the News:ShareMany companies today have corporate social responsibility programs that aim to improve their social and environmental impacts—and their appeal for investors and consumers. But critics argue that some of these programs are merely cosmetic and allow companies to continue to pursue socially or environmentally harmful business practices around the world. GlacierHub took a closer look at one CSR initiative that involves a glacier in South America. Sponsoring a Glacier Expedition The Utah-based outdoor clothing and gear company KÜHL, one of the largest outdoor gear companies in the U.S., states on its website that it is passionate about protecting the natural environment. As part of its mission, KÜHL, which is a play on the German word for “cool,” says that it aims to support the health of its employees, customers and beautiful open spaces. In late 2016, the company sponsored a research expedition for two Boise State University professors, a volcanologist and a geophysicist. The pair traveled to a glacier-covered volcano in Chile along with a photographer and filmmaker who documented the journey. The company provided the expedition with gear. Brittany Brand, co-author of a 2017 volcanic hazard study featured here, was one of the two professors from Boise State whose research was sponsored by KÜHL. Brand runs the Physical Volcanology group at Boise State University and is interested in volcanic eruption dynamics and hazard assessment. Jeffrey Johnson, the other professor on the expedition, used the opportunity to study the geophysics of volcanic eruptive processes. The team visited one of Chile’s most active volcanoes, the Villarica. Due to glacial ice at the top, lahar events, or debris flows, were triggered during the eruptions of 1964 and 1971. The field data collected by the Boise State team at the Villarica helped the scientists develop experimental models after they returned to the United States. Johnson told GlacierHub that he was happy to accept corporate sponsorship of his environmental research. “Scientific researchers are always grateful for outside support when it is offered.” Matthew Wordell, the photographer for the trip, further explained to GlacierHub that the KÜHL Racr X Full Zip jacket was great help during their trek. They needed lightweight and breathable gear, and the jacket proved to be invaluable. Of course, by wearing the company’s clothing on the expedition, the team of four also promoted the KÜHL brand, as videos and photos from the trip were shared on the company’s blog and Instagram account. “With sponsors on board, it was important to be hyper aware of how the environment and gear interacted to create compelling imagery, often with little more than a few seconds to compose and capture the moment before it was gone,” Wordell explained in a post on the KÜHL website.  A Fuller View of Corporate Social Responsibility Recent articles in the New York Times, The Guardian, and Forbes have highlighted cases in which corporations with poor environmental records use corporate social responsibility programs to promote images of themselves as leaders in environmental protection. But as noted in a study by Graeme Auld and others published in Annual Review of Environment and Resources, some companies do work to promote sustainability well beyond the requirements of environmental regulations, both from personal commitments of their leaders as well as a wish to attract customers who seek green products and services.  So what is KÜHL’s environmental record like outside of this branding program? When questioned about the sponsorship, a marketing representative from KÜHL told GlacierHub that she was contacted directly by the film production crew that documented the trip. Both Johnson and Brand are affiliated with this production crew. KÜHL’s marketing representative was sent a proposal by the crew, and KÜHL...

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Photo Friday: Aleutian Islands from the Sky, Sea and Space

Posted by on May 19, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images | 1 comment

Photo Friday: Aleutian Islands from the Sky, Sea and Space

Spread the News:ShareThis week’s Photo Friday explores the Aleutian Islands in Alaska. The Aleutian Islands, which separate the Bering Sea from the Pacific Ocean, consist of a series of islands and islets that contain 40 active and 17 inactive volcanoes. These volcanic islands formed from the subduction of the Pacific tectonic plate beneath the North American tectonic plate, and some of the volcanoes are glaciated. Scientists have determined that many of the islands had glaciers at one period. The Aleutian Islands are also part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge (AMNWR), which protects various seabird colonies. As the largest wildlife refuge in the United States, more seabirds nest on the islands than anywhere else in North America. Puffins, gulls, cormorants, cackling geese, and terns, among others, call the area home. See pictures of some of these birds and the Aleutian Islands from the air,  land, and sea below.           Spread the...

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Listening to Glaciers Artfully

Posted by on May 10, 2017 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Featured Posts | 0 comments

Listening to Glaciers Artfully

Spread the News:ShareJonathan Gilmurray, the author of “Ecological Sound Art,” covers artists who have created works based on the sounds made by melting glaciers. Gilmurray argues that ecological sound art can be effective at motivating people to combat climate change. He also believes that it should be more fully appreciated on its own as a new art form.   Also known as environmentalist sound art, ecological sound art incorporates naturally-occurring sound, with or without modification, and other elements to depict or evoke the environment. It is a form of artwork that draws on a key principle of environmental ethics, the connectedness between humans and the natural environment. Gilmurray believes ecological sound art can be more effective than other forms of ecological art because of sound’s unique ability to reveal relationships that exists between things in the world. The act of listening implies an attentiveness to the natural world, a greater degree of relatedness than might be found in the works of a visual artist who seeks to capture or depict the natural world as an object. Gilmurray explains Ecological Sound Art here:  Ecological sound artists convey ecological messages about the subjects they record by evoking emotions within their listeners through various means. Some, like Chris Watson, use recordings from their fieldwork. His piece Vatnajökull from 2003 is a collage of recordings tracing the journey of 10,000-year-old ice from the Icelandic glacier Vatnajökull. The recordings follow the waters of the glacier as they form from melting ice and flow into the Atlantic Ocean. Listen to a snippet of his work here. In addition to the sound of ice on the move, people who listen to this piece also hear birds calling each other overhead, the creaking of the ship Watson voyaged on, and waves on the Atlantic Ocean. The UK-based audiovisual organization Touch provides the following description of Watson’s piece: “The most eerie aspect of it is the strange ‘singing’ events which occur throughout, especially by the end of the piece when we’re tossing about on the ocean and an unidentifiable spectral singing hovers over the surface of the sea, causing you to believe in sirens.”  Another artist, Jana Winderen, seeks to “reveal the complexity and strangeness of the unseen world beneath.” Some of her art was recorded inside of glacier crevasses in Greenland, Iceland, and Norway. In a statement on her website, she explains, “I like the immateriality of a sound work and the openness it can have for both associative and direct experience and sensory perception.” You can listen to her 2010 piece Energy Field, which incorporates sounds from northern winds, ravens and running dogs.Evaporation by Jana Winderen(Evaporation (2009) by Jana Winderen) Other artists combine their field recordings with digital enhancements for a different effect, which many find to be more musical. Daniel Blinkhorn incorporated crackling sounds from the fjords of Svalbard in the Arctic Ocean with electronic static sounds. On his website, he provides samples of the original recording and digitally re-mastered version so that listeners can compare for themselves. To achieve their desired effects, ecological sound artists employ highly sensitive hydrophones (underwater microphones) and vibration sensors. To some listeners, the end result is so pleasing to the ear that they question why more art shows and galleries do not include an auditory component. Gilmurray is working toward addressing that gap. He hopes that ecological sound art will become as recognized as other forms of environmentalist art. Over the years, other ecological sound artists have explored a variety of techniques to evoke a human response to climate change. By creating live recordings, Katie Paterson allowed her audience to dial a...

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Roundup: Brown Haze, A Glacier Song, and Adventure Sixty North

Posted by on May 1, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: Brown Haze, A Glacier Song, and Adventure Sixty North

Spread the News:ShareRoundup: A Video, A Glacier Song and Pollution Glacier Retreat from Rick Brown’s Perspective From Vimeo: In the video “Glacier Exit” by Raphael Rogers, Rick Brown, owner of Adventure Sixty North, takes viewers on a glacier ice hike. Rick has been guiding tours in Seward, Alaska, since the early 1990s. On this particular tour, Rick points out areas where the glaciers have been retreating at a rate of 150 feet per year. This retreat, which used to take hundreds of years, now only takes a year or two and is resulting in visible wildlife changes. The video quotes Lord Byron – “I love not Man the less, but Nature more.” Watch the stunning video “Glacier Exit” here.   Brown Haze Particles Over the Himalayas From Atmospheric Environment: “The Tibetan Plateau is one of the largest plateaus in the world. Its glaciers are a major source of rivers like the Indus, the Ganges and the Yangtze. Yet, the rapid pace of urbanization and industrialization along the elevated site of the Himalayas have subsequently increased the burden of atmospheric pollution (which has adversely affected the Himalayan glaciers and hence the climate system). Brown haze can consist of soot, fly ash, organic particles and various salts. Its deposition on Tibetan glaciers is an important factor responsible for rapid glacier retreat and thermal heating.” Read more about brown haze and its implications here.   Electronic Musician GLOKMIN’s New Song “Glacier” From Twitter: “Glacier” is the title of the new single by the electronic musician GLOKMIN. He is a 21-year old artist from Alexandria, Virginia, and he performs in Washington D.C. From his song, you can hear some glacier/ambient sounds coupled with lyrics such as “your heart’s a melting glacier.” The song begins with the sound of a glacier cracking and falling onto the ground below. Listen to the full song and others by this artist here.   Spread the...

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