Roundup: New Bacteria, Poetic Shasta, and Glacial Melt

New Bacteria Discovered at Tibetan Glacier

From Microbiology Society: “A cold-tolerant, translucent, yellow-pigmented, Gram-stain-positive, non-motile, rod-shaped bacteria was isolated from snow of the Zadang Glacier on the Tibetan Plateau, PR China. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity analysis indicated that the isolate was closely related to Conyzicola lurida KCTC 29231 and Leifsonia psychrotolerans DSM 22824 at a level of 97.72 and 97.49 %, respectively. Other close relatives had a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of less than 97 %… Based on phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain ZD5-4 was considered to represent a novel species of the genus Conyzicola, for which the name Conyzicola nivalis sp. nov. is proposed.”

Read more about the new species of bacteria here.

An aerial image of the Tibetan Plateau where a new species of bacteria was discovered (Source: NASA/Creative Commons).

U.S. Geologist Clarence King’s Poetic Mount Shasta

From Project MUSE: “But, for all his complexities, King’s recorded observations of wilderness places rise above his life’s convolutions. Unfortunately, what escapes many scholars is the remarkableness of King’s writing, an irony considering its salience; in fact, King’s brilliance is best illustrated in his lexical finesse, poetic flights of language, and artistic verisimilitude of nature’s beauties.”

Learn more about the poetic perceptions and mastery of language of the late geologist Clarence King here.

Sunrise over Mount Shasta (Source: Michael Zanger/Creative Commons).

New Insights on Glacier Meltwater

From Geophysical Research Letters: “Arctic river discharge has increased in recent decades although sources and mechanisms remain debated. Abundant literature documents permafrost thaw and mountain glacier shrinkage over the past decades. Here we link glacier runoff to aquifer recharge via a losing headwater stream in subarctic Interior Alaska. Field measurements in Jarvis Creek (634 km2), a subbasin of the Tanana and Yukon Rivers, show glacier meltwater runoff as a large component (15–28%) of total annual streamflow despite low glacier cover (3%)… Our findings suggest a linkage between glacier wastage, aquifer recharge along the headwater stream corridor, and lowland winter discharge. Accordingly, glacierized headwater streambeds may serve as major aquifer recharge zones in semiarid climates and therefore contributing to year-round base flow of lowland rivers.”

Read more about the new research here.

The Tanana River, Alaska (Source: Ron Reiring/Creative Commons).
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