Roundup: The Godfather of Modern Ecology and China

A Hundred Years of Data

From National Geographic: “It’s not often an ecologist gets to play sleuth in so adventurous a fashion— picking through musty papers in the Midwest for 100-year-old hand-drawn maps that lead through dense Alaskan underbrush populated by wolves and brown bears. But that’s how scientist Brian Buma tracked down the work of a legend— a godfather of modern ecology so prominent in his field that the Ecological Society of America has an award named after him.”

Read more about Buma’s trekking and his findings here.

When William Cooper visited in 1916, this bay was filled with glacier ice (Source: Brian Buma).

 

All Not Quiet on the Western Front

From the BBC: “China has accused India of incursion into its territory between Sikkim and Tibet, in a dispute which has raised tensions between the countries. Officials said Indian border guards had obstructed “normal activities” on the Chinese side, and called on India to immediately withdraw them. India also recently accused Chinese troops of incursion on its side.”

Read more about this geopolitical hotspot here.

The entrance to the Nathu La pass, between India and China (source: Abhishek Kumar/Creative Commons).

On the Tibetan Plateau…

From the Chinese Academy of Sciences: “China on Saturday began its second scientific expedition to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau to study changes in climate, biodiversity and environment over the past decades. The expedition will last five to 10 years and the first stop will be Serling Tso, a 2,391-square-kilometer lake that was confirmed to have replaced the Buddhist holy lake Namtso as Tibet’s largest in 2014.”

Read more about the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ upcoming research project here.

Satellite image of the Serling Tso lake (source: NASA/Creative Commons).
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