Month / May 2017

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  • Learning from a Flood-Alarm System’s Fate

    A longer version of this post appeared in the April 2017 issue of EcoAmericas. When a flood from a mountain lake threatened to swamp the town of Carhuaz in the Peruvian Andes early one morning in April 2010, Víctor Rodríguez was the only person who knew. From his hut on a plain below the mountain,…

  • Let it Snow… and Save a Glacier

    News about shrinking glaciers is not uncommon, but have you ever heard of regrowing one artificially? That is exactly what a team of researchers intends to do: use snow machines, also known as Schneekanonen (snow-cannons) in German, to save Morteratsch Glacier in the Swiss Alps. Felix Keller, a glaciologist at the Academia Engiadina in Switzerland,…

  • Roundup: Glacier Lakes, Narwhals, and Water Stress

    Roundup: Glacier Lakes, Narwhals and Water Stress in Kyrgyzstan

  • Photo Friday: Inside Glacier Caves

    Caves can form within glaciers as a result of water running through or under a glacier. They are often called ice caves, but the term more accurately describes caves in bedrock that contain ice throughout the year. Water usually forms on the glacier’s surface through melting, before flowing down a moulin (vertical to nearly vertical shafts…

  • Exploring Corporate Social Responsibility with KÜHL

    Corporate social responsibility holds corporations accountable for their social and environmental impacts. Recent debates over the legitimacy of corporate social responsibility encouraged GlacierHub to explore the issue further. Of late, GlacierHub learned of a corporate social responsibility initiative that involves glaciers in South America, and sought to learn more.

  • No-Fly Zone Administered Over Glacier Crash Site

    In 1952, a military plane crashed into Mount Gannett, 50 miles east of Anchorage, killing all 52 people on board. It was found in 2012, but has taken years to retrieve the remains because rescuers can only travel in June, when conditions are safest on Colony Glacier. The receding glacier made the crash visible but has also allowed sightseers on helicopters to travel there, risking disturbing the remains and the removal of artifacts. As a result, a no-fly zone was administered by the Federal Aviation Administration to stop people from visiting.

  • Using Kayaks and Drones to Explore Glaciers

    Field study sounds cool: a group of scientists take boats out into untraveled waters on an important scientific mission, even witnessing extraordinary scenery like an iceberg calving event along the journey. However, the breathtaking beauty of such a trip can also come at a price, sometimes even human life! “I like working in Alaska, but…

  • Roundup: Hazard Films, Water Scarcity, and Peace Building

    Roundup: Films, Water and Peace   Films Raise Awareness in Volcanic Regions From Science Direct: “The medium of film is well established for education and communication about hazardous phenomena as it provides engaging ways to directly view hazards and their impacts… Using volcanic eruptions as a focus, an evidence-based methodology was devised to create, use, and…

  • Photo Friday: Aleutian Islands from the Sky, Sea and Space

    The Aleutian Islands which separate the Bering Sea from the Pacific Ocean, consist of a series of islands and islets that contain 40 active and 17 inactive volcanoes.

  • Don’t Step on the Crack at Petermann Glacier

    Cracks in ice shelves have appeared in disaster movies as ominous signs of global warming. One memorable instance occurs in The Day After Tomorrow when a paleoclimatologist is drilling ice cores at the Larsen Ice Shelf. The shelf breaks apart, leading to a series of cataclysmic climate events that disrupt the North Atlantic Ocean circulation.…