Roundup: Volcanoes, Cryoseismology and Hydropower

Posted by on Dec 5, 2016

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Roundup: Kamchatka, Cryoseismology and Bhutan

 

Activity in Kamchatka’s Glacier-Covered Volcanoes

From KVERT: “The Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) monitors 30 active volcanoes of Kamchatka and six active volcanoes of Northern Kuriles [both in Russia]. Not all of these volcanoes had eruptions in historical time; however, they are potentially active and therefore are of concern to aviation... In Russia, KVERT, on behalf of the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (IVS), is responsible for providing information on volcanic activity to international air navigation services for the airspace users.” Many of these volcanoes are glacier-covered, and the interactions between lava and ice can create dramatic ice plumes. Sheveluch Volcano currently has an orange aviation alert, with possible “ash explosions up to 26,200-32,800 ft (8-10 km) above sea level… Ongoing activity could affect international and low-flying aircraft.”

Read more about the volcanic warnings here, or check out GlacierHub’s collection of photos from the eruption of Klyuchevskoy.

Klyuchevskoy, one of the glacier-covered volcanoes in Kamchatka that KVERT monitors, erupting in 1993. (Source: Giorgio Galeotti/Flickr)

Klyuchevskoy, a glacier-covered volcano monitored by KVERT, erupting in 1993 (Source: Giorgio Galeotti/Creative Commons).

 

New Insights Into Seismic Activity Caused by Glaciers 

In Reviews of Geophysics: “New insights into basal motion, iceberg calving, glacier, iceberg, and sea ice dynamics, and precursory signs of unstable glaciers and ice structural changes are being discovered with seismological techniques. These observations offer an invaluable foundation for understanding ongoing environmental changes and for future monitoring of ice bodies worldwide… In this review we discuss seismic sources in the cryosphere as well as research challenges for the near future.”

Read more about the study here.

The calving front of an ice shelf in West Antarctica as seen from above (Source: NASA/Flickr)

The calving front of an ice shelf in West Antarctica (Source: NASA/Creative Commons).

 

The Future of Hydropower in Bhutan

From TheThirdPole.net: An interview with Chhewang Rinzin, the managing director of Bhutan’s Druk Green Power Corporation, reveals the multifaceted challenges involved in hydropower projects in Bhutan. These challenges include the effect of climate change on glaciers: “The glaciers are melting and the snowfall is much less than it was in the 1960s and 70s. That battery that you have in a form of snow and glaciers up there – which melts in the spring months and brings in additional water – will slowly go away…But the good news is that with climate change, many say that the monsoons will be wetter and there will be more discharge,” said Rinzin.

Check out the full interview with Chhewang Rinzin here. For more about hydropower in Bhutan, see GlacierHub’s earlier story.

Hydropower plants are common in rivers fed by melting ice and snow in the Himalayas (Source: Kashyap Joshi/Wikimedia Commons)

A hydropower plant common in rivers fed by melting ice and snow in the Himalayas (Source: Kashyap Joshi/Creative Commons).

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