Roundup: Glacier-Fed Lakes, Remote Sensing, and Glacial Succession

Roundup: Glacier-Fed Lakes, Remote Sensing, and Soil

 

Global Warming and Glacier-Fed Lakes

From Freshwater Biology: “Climate warming is accelerating the retreat of glaciers, and recently, many ‘new’ glacial turbid lakes have been created. In the course of time, the loss of the hydrological connectivity to a glacier causes, however, changes in their water turbidity (cloudiness) and turns these ecosystems into clear ones. To understand potential differences in the food-web structure between glacier-fed turbid and clear alpine lakes, we sampled ciliates (single-celled animals bearing ciliates), phyto-, bacterio- and zooplankton in one clear and one glacial turbid alpine lake, and measured key physicochemical parameters. In particular, we focused on the ciliate community and the potential drivers for their abundance distribution.”

Learn more about how global warming affects lakes here:

screen-shot-2016-11-20-at-5-28-27-pm
A glacier-fed lake (Source: Rodrigo Soldon/Creative Commons).

 

Glacier Remote Sensing Using Sentinel-2

From Remote Sensing: “Mapping of glacier extents from automated classification of optical satellite images has become a major application of the freely available images from Landsat. A widely applied method is based on segmented ratio images from a red and shortwave infrared band. With the now available data from Sentinel-2 (S2) and Landsat 8 (L8) there is high potential to further extend the existing time series (starting with Landsat 4/5 in 1982) and to considerably improve over previous capabilities, thanks to increased spatial resolution and dynamic range, a wider swath width and more frequent coverage.”

Read more about remote sensing here:

Test region 1 in the Kunlun Mountains in northern Tibet using a S2A image from 18 November 2015 (Source: Remote Sensing).
Test region 1 in Tibet using a S2A image from 2015 (Source: Remote Sensing).

 

The Impact of Soil During Glacial Succession

From Journal of Ecology: “Plant–soil interactions are temporally dynamic in ways that are important for the development of plant communities. Yet, during primary succession [colonization of plant life in a deglaciated landscape], the degree to which changing soil characteristics (e.g. increasing nutrient availabilities) and developing communities of soil biota influence plant growth and species turnover is not well understood. We conducted a two-phase glasshouse experiment with two native plant species and soils collected from three ages (early, mid- and late succession) of an actively developing glacial chronosequence ranging from approximately 5 to <100 years in age.”

Learn more about the impact of soil during glacier succession here:

glacier-lyman-tamarack
A photo of Lyman Glacier with different plants growing on its face (Source: Marshmallow/ Creative Commons).

 

Please follow, share and like us:

Share your thoughts