Month / November 2016

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  • Asian Piolets d’Or Awards Recognize Outstanding Alpine Athleticism

    On November 4th, the International Climbing and Mountaineering Federation (UIAA) held the 11th annual Asia Piolets d’Or awards, commemorating outstanding achievements in rock climbing and mountaineering. Considered by many to be the Oscars of alpinism, the awards have motivated progression in Asian mountaineering culture over the last decade, contributing to an ethos of safety, respect…

  • An Earthquake, a Landslide and Two Glaciers in New Zealand

    Glaciers can play an important role in landscape dynamics, interacting with other factors to shape landscape development. Two days after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck North Canterbury, New Zealand, a landslide occurred between nearby Fox and Franz Josef glaciers. This landslide could offer insight into the role of glaciers in seismically active areas, particularly concerning…

  • Roundup: Breeding Grounds, Ecosystems, Macroinvertebrates

    Roundup: Glacial Retreat, Ecosystems, Macroinvertebrate Communities

  • Photo Friday: Thanksgiving Dinner and High Altitude Meals

    In the United States, the Thanksgiving holiday represents a day to give thanks for all of our blessings and signals the beginning of the winter holiday season. The day is often celebrated with a traditional turkey dinner in the company of family and friends. In the spirit of Thanksgiving’s gastronomical tradition, GlacierHub took a look at…

  • Iceberg Killing Fields Threaten Carbon Cycling

    Ryder Bay is helping mitigate impacts of climate change through removing carbon from the atmosphere to the ocean, where they can remain for centuries.

  • High Altitude Plants Discovered in the Himalayas

    Melting glaciers in the Himalayas have exposed land underneath, allowing new forms of life to migrate to deglaciated landscapes. Recently, these glacial changes have led to the discovery of the world’s highest altitude vascular plants, made possible by the early colonization of microbes in the space left by retreating glacier ice, according to a recent…

  • Twin Glacier Avalanches Stun Tibet and Baffle Glaciologists

    Early on July 17, 2016, the Aru Range of Tibet experienced a massive, unexpected glacier avalanche that propelled ice and rock down into the surrounding valley. The glacier collapse of roughly 60-70 million cubic meters killed nine herders and hundreds of animals within 40 square kilometers. Controversy remains among glaciologists about what caused the avalanche in…

  • Roundup: Glacier-Fed Lakes, Remote Sensing, and Glacial Succession

    Roundup: Glacier-Fed Lakes, Remote Sensing, and Soil   Global Warming and Glacier-Fed Lakes From Freshwater Biology: “Climate warming is accelerating the retreat of glaciers, and recently, many ‘new’ glacial turbid lakes have been created. In the course of time, the loss of the hydrological connectivity to a glacier causes, however, changes in their water turbidity (cloudiness)…

  • Photo Friday: Antarctic Glaciers Monitored by NASA

    As the world’s fifth largest continent, Antarctica provides a unique record of the Earth’s past climate through its geomorphological record of glacier moraines. Antarctic glaciers terminate on land or in the sea as either floating ice shelves or grounded or floating outlet glaciers. As such, numerous climate scientists are conducting research about the ice shelf and glacier landforms in the…

  • Tibetan Plateau Shows Warming Slowdown

    From 2001 to 2014, climate scientists observed a “hiatus” or pause in global warming. It is an issue that has led to much discussion in the scientific community and among climate skeptics who see the trend as an indication that global warming does not exist. According to a paper published by Fyfe et al., the…