Month / July 2016

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  • Photo Friday: Ice diving in the Alps – Glacial Lake Sassolo

    Franco Banfi is a professional underwater photographer, renowned for his spectacular images of marine wildlife, captured across every ocean on the planet. In 2010, Banfi, a Swiss national, dived into the Lago di Sassolo (Lake Sassolo) to reveal the hidden wonders of the ice mazes which form in the glacial lake at 6,560 feet (2,000 m) above…

  • First global analysis of the societal impacts of glacier floods

    Two British researchers recently published the first global inventory and damage assessment of the societal consequences incurred by glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs). They revealed that glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) have been declining in frequency since the mid-1990s, with the majority released by ice dam failures. Glacial hazard specialists Jonathan Carrivick and Fiona Tweed…

  • Survival is just the tip of the iceberg in Blair Braverman’s memoir on Arctic life

    “On a bad day we called it the Goddamn Ice Cube. On a good day Summer Camp on the Moon.”   In her memoir published July 5, writer and musher Blair Braverman recounts her time living in the isolated wilderness of the Arctic, and her struggles to reconcile the many contradictions—both real and perceived—that accompanied…

  • As Glaciers Melt, Tourists Keep on Coming to New Zealand

    While more people are visiting iconic New Zealand glaciers because of concerns that climate change might wipe out the ice masses altogether, visitors are reportedly underwhelmed by the melting, gray glaciers.  This finding is documented in a new multidisciplinary study, “Implications of climate change for glacier tourism,” released last month in Tourism Geographies. The findings were published…

  • Roundup: Antarctica and Greenland in peril, black carbon

    Ninety percent of the western Antarctic Peninsula’s glaciers are retreating From Carbon Brief: “These rivers of ice ooze their way down through the Peninsula’s rocky mountain range and into the ocean, powered by gravity and their own weight. But of the 674 glaciers on the Peninsula’s western side, almost 90% are retreating. This happens when their…

  • Photo Friday: Scott Conarroe’s Shifting Borders

    Scott Conarroe’s photography exhibit Frontière, Frontiera and Grenze, displayed at Fine Art Lugano in Switzerland from May 19 to July 29, is in its last week. The title of the work translates to the word border in French, Italian and German. Conarro’s photographic study of the glaciers was inspired by the shifting borders between European countries…

  • Iceland’s fire decimates its ice: Eyjafjallajökull

    A new scientific study investigates the interactions between the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull’s lava flow and the overlaying ice cap, revealing previously unknown subglacial lava-ice interactions. Six years after  the eruption, the volcano is revisited by the author of the study, Björn Oddsson, a geophysicist with Iceland’s Department of Civil Protection and Emergency Management. He and…

  • Polar Ecology in Flux Due to Climate Change

    Glacial melting and rising ocean temperatures are affecting the feeding, breeding and dispersion patterns of species, such as krill, cod, seals and  polar bears, in the polar regions, according to two recently published research articles. This climatic shift could create an imbalance in the regional ecology and negatively impact numerous species as the effects of climate change…

  • Continuous Topography, Argentiere Glacier no. 1

    Nature Meets Technology with Artist Dan Holdsworth

    For the last fifteen years, British photographer Dan Holdsworth has been blending nature, science, and technology into large-scale photographs and digital art. Much of his work focuses on glacial landscapes. Holdsworth’s major solo exhibition, “Dan Holdsworth: A Future Archaeology,” is currently premiering at the Scheublein + Bak Gallery in Zurich as part of his Continuous…

  • Roundup: Changing Waterways, Hotter Parks, Glacier Music

    As a Glacier Retreats a Major Water Source Dries Up From CBC News: “It’s [the Kaskawulsh glacier] been the main source of water into Yukon’s Kluane Lake for centuries, but now the Slims River has suddenly slimmed down — to nothing. ‘What folks have noticed this spring is that it’s essentially dried up,’ said Jeff Bond of the…