Photo Friday: Volcanoes of the Kamchatka Peninsula

The Kamchatka Peninsula, located in remote Far East Russia, is part of the “Ring of Fire” and is known for its volcanic activity. The 102,400 square mile region has the highest concentration of active volcanoes in the world.

The Kamchatka Peninsula captured by the MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
(Photo credit MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC.)

The Klyuchevskoy volcano is one of the seven active glacier-capped volcanoes in the remote region. At a towering 4,835 meters, the Klyuchevskoy, the area’s tallest volcano, is known for its beauty and symmetry.

Photograph of Klyuchevsky taken July 2006 (Wikimedia Commons)
Klyuchevskoy, as seen on July 2006. (Wikimedia Commons.)

Considered Kamchatka’s most active volcano, Klyuchevskoy has the likely potential to erupt and is currently listed as code orange. The volcano’s current lava flows still are no match for the 1994 eruption, which sent volcanic ash nine miles high into the atmosphere.

1994 eruption of the Klyuchevsky Volcano, taken by NASA
(Photo credit NASA.)

Over the past three decades, satellites have captured many eruptions within the Kamchatka Peninsula, like the 1994 eruption of Klyuchevskoy, seen here. In January of 2013, four volcanoes—Shiveluch, Bezymianny, Tolbachik, and Kizimen — erupted at the same time.

Ash plume over Shiveluch, one of the four volcanoes to erupt on january 1, 2013. (NASA)
Ash plume over Shiveluch, one of the four volcanoes that erupted January 2013. (Photo credit NASA.)

In 2010 a unique photograph of the region was taken from the International Space Station, providing a unique perspective of the glacier-capped volcanoes.

Kamchatka Peninsula as seen from the International Space Station (NASA)
Kamchatka Peninsula as seen from the International Space Station. (Photo credit NASA.)
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