Roundup: Hockey, Daredevil Tourists, Microbial Diets

Each week, we highlight three stories from the forefront of glacier news.

Hockey Warms Up Village in Kyrgyzstan

Hockey rink in Kyrgyzstan, screenshot from video in news article. (Photo: Video Screenshot/RFE/RL)
Hockey rink in Kyrgyzstan, screenshot from video in news article. (Photo: Video Screenshot/RFE/RL)

From Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty:

“In the mountains of northern Kyrgyzstan, winters can be long and cold. So people in the tiny village of Kenesh have come up with a healthy way to keep active and fit. Each day, almost all of the villagers lace up their skates, and grab a stick to play ice hockey.”

Watch the video to find out more about this unique practice.

Tourists on Frozen Lagoons Test Limits of Safety

Tour guides warn that the constantly moving waters under lagoon ice creates ideal conditions for the ice to break under someone's weight (Photo: Matt Locke/Flikr)
Hove Lagoon, one similar to that in the article. (Photo:Matt Locke/Flikr)

From Iceland Magazine:

“Tour guides and visitors at Jökulsárlón glacial lagoon in South East Iceland watched in shock and disbelief as a large group of people had managed to get themselves near the centre of the lagoon by jumping between ice floats and walking on the frozen lagoon.”

Read more about the risks involved.

Poor Diet Limits Microbial Growth on Debris-Covered Glaciers

Debris-covered glacier in southern Norway. (Photo:NASA/GSFC/Kimberly Casey/Flikr)
Debris-covered glacier in southern Norway. (Photo:NASA/GSFC/Kimberly Casey/Flikr)

From Soil Biology and Biochemistry:

“Photosynthetic microbial communities are important to the functioning of early successional ecosystems, but we know very little about the factors that limit the growth of these communities, especially in remote glacial and periglacial environments. The goal of the present study was to gain insight into the degree to which nutrients limit the growth of photosynthetic microbes in sediments from the surface of the Toklat Glacier in central Alaska.”

Read more about how nutrient availability is affecting life on glaciers.

Please follow, share and like us:

1 Comment

Join the discussion and tell us your opinion.

Jeffryreply
March 02, 2016 at 09:03 AM

Very interesting.

Leave a reply