Month / February 2016

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  • Roundup: Hockey, Daredevil Tourists, Microbial Diets

    Each week, we highlight three stories from the forefront of glacier news. Hockey Warms Up Village in Kyrgyzstan From Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty: “In the mountains of northern Kyrgyzstan, winters can be long and cold. So people in the tiny village of Kenesh have come up with a healthy way to keep active and fit. Each…

  • Photo Friday: Spotlight on Heard Island and Big Ben Volcano

    Big Ben, a volcano on the remote sub-Antarctic Heard Island, has erupted 3 times in the past 5 years, but scientists have just recently been able to capture live images.

  • A Lake in Bolivia Dries Up

    In December 2015, while the world’s eyes were on the UN Climate Conference in Paris, Bolivia’s Lake Poopó—once the country’s second-largest lake, with an area of 2700 square kilometers–dried up completely. This event was first recognized by the regional government, located in Oruro, and soon drew national and international concern. This attention has opened a…

  • Bacteria From the Sahara Desert Found on Swiss Glaciers

    Bacteria living among dust particles from the Sahara have been found trapped in ice and snow on the Swiss Alps at an altitude of over 11,000 feet, according to a December article in Frontiers in Microbiology. The samplings collected from the Jungfraujoch region of Switzerland contained bacteria originally from northwest Africa, meaning these bacteria survived…

  • Crevasses Offer Clues About Glacial Dynamics

    A recent article accepted in the Reviews of Geophysics summarizes research on how crevasses form and affect glaciers. Crevasses are fractures in the glacier surface that are renowned for their danger but also have been a research focus for glaciologists and other physical scientists for the past several decades, a subject which William Colgan of York University…

  • Roundup: Climate Change and Algae Impact Rivers

    Each week, we highlight three stories from the forefront of glacier news. Climate Cycles Influence River Flows in Pacific Northwest From Advances in Water Research: “We evaluate interannual flow variability in three transboundary PCTR [Pacific Coast Temperate Rainforest] watersheds in response to El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), Arctic Oscillation (AO), and North Pacific Gyre…

  • Photo Friday: Arctic Sea Ice Extent Reaches a New Low

    As global warming continues, Arctic sea ice broke the record this year, reaching a new low extent for the month of January. January is typically a month of relatively large sea ice extent, with the annual maximum occurring between February and April. A low sea ice extent in January suggests that the annual maximum, coming…

  • Life by Ice: An Alaskan Poet’s Account

    I couldn’t have known, ten years ago, how that first little taste of Wrangell Mountains backcountry would lead to an obsession with glaciers. I’d had some first dates with Alaska’s Kennicott Valley in prior years, including memorable forays on the accessible Root Glacier. It set the hook hard, with its crisp trim lines, succession zones,…

  • Addressing Mountains in a Peruvian Village

    From 2010 to 2012, Astrid Stensrud, currently a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Oslo, researched climate change in the Colca Canyon of southern Peru, as part of the project “From Ice to Stone” from the Department of Anthropology at the University of Copenhagen. With climate change, water insecurity has caused new uncertainties for farmers…

  • Days After Surviving Avalanche, Indian Soldier Dies

    The only surviving member of a group of 10 Indian soldiers that was hit by a Himalayan avalanche on February 3 has died from his injuries, the BBC reported. The soldier, Hanumanthappa Koppad, was found alive on February 8 deep under the snow at an altitude of about 19,600 feet, days after the deadly avalanche…