Glacier Water Now In A Vodka Near You

Icebergs are harvested for use in a variety of different hard alcohols. (Source: Alaska Distillery)
Icebergs are harvested for use in a variety of different hard alcohols. (Source: Alaska Distillery)

Are you there vodka? It’s me, glacial water.

Protected for centuries from pollutants in the air and sea, water from glaciers has sprung up in a new market: liquor.

“It’s the notion that it’s kind of untouched by human hands,” Beverage World editor in chief Jeff Cioletti told Outside Magazine in 2013, “you can’t get water purer than that.”

The makers of Iceberg Vodka harvest their ice from Canada's Iceberg Alley. (Source: Iceberg Vodka)
The makers of Iceberg Vodka harvest their ice from Canada’s Iceberg Alley. (Source: Iceberg Vodka)

Water with fewer impurities is a key element in high-quality liquor. Though using glacial water small part of the market, several companies are using water trapped in glaciers for thousands of years to make vodka and other liquors, including Finlandia, Estonia’s Ston vodka, and Alaska Distillery.

Since glacier harvesting is not done substantially, there is little regulation of it. Alaska is the only U.S. state that requires permits in order to use the water. Scott Lindquist, the head distiller of Alaska Distillery, is the sole holder of such a permit. His company is using meltwater from icebergs broken off of the Harding Ice Field in Prince William Sound to make vodka. Yet, Lindquist is not alone, people from Newfoundland and Labrador, where permits are also required from the provincial government, have been harvesting icebergs for centuries. Ed Kean, a fifth-generation sea captain, seeks Canadian icebergs every year for a local vodka maker, a brewer, a winery and a bottled-water outfit in Newfoundland. Icebergs calved off the ice-shelf of Greenland arrive in Newfoundland and Labrador during spring and early summer and they can be harvested until late September.

Glacial water figures into many different spirits from the Alaska Distillery. (Source: Alaska Distillery)
Glacial water figures into many different spirits from the Alaska Distillery. (Source: Alaska Distillery)

Iceberg harvesting is not an easy job and choosing the right bergs is a skill. Years of experience is required to determine where and which iceberg to harvest as well as how to remove the ice without rolling the iceberg. People like Lindquist and Kean are particular about the glacial loot they gather. They prefer clean, round pieces not exposed to the sun too long to avoid evaporation of the “oldest and tastiest inner crystals”. Once they’ve found the suitable ice, they would scoop up or break off pieces of ice using tools like hydraulic claw. The difficulty of iceberg harvesting is the reason that Lindquist is the only remaining ice-harvesting permit holder in Alaska, which once stood at 12 issued permits.

Although beverages containing glacial water are attractive, it is also a challenging market. Despite the technical difficulties of iceberg harvesting, this activity may be opposed by tourism industries. Some local tourism officials in Newfoundland think iceberg harvesting is threatening the unspoiled beauty, which is a main tourist attraction each summer in Newfoundland. “Demand for iceberg is booming,” Kean told Wall Street Journal last year. Keeping up with demand for iceberg-infused drinks is another big challenge for these companies.

To learn more about icebergs in Newfoundland, check out GlacierHub’s story on Canada’s Iceberg Alley.

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Vodka Social Club | Água glacial é utilizada na fabricação de vodkasreply
December 01, 2014 at 01:12 PM

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