Glacier stories you may have missed this week – 9/29

Posted by on Sep 29, 2014

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Nepal tourism adapts to climate change

“Weather can ruin the vacation while climate can devastate a holiday destination. Climate change not only impacts on tourism directly by changes in temperature, extreme weather events and other climatic factors, but it will also transform the natural environment that attracts tourists. Despite the global nature of tourism industry and its economic contributions, scholars of climate change research have hardly acknowl- edged the threat of climate change to the tourism industry.”

Read more about Nepal’s tourism industry’s efforts to deal with climate change in this study in the International Journal of Disciplinary Studies.

 

Pakistan needs more glacier data-sharing to mitigate disasters

“‘Our elders used to say this glacier was very high, so high there was no one living here. This was a giant glacial lake,’ Sajjad Ali said. Standing on a cliffside, he pointed down at the Hopar Glacier, more than a 1,000 metres below, its surface covered by massive boulders it had swept out of its way as it carved a valley through the Karakoram mountains.”

Read more about in Pakistan’s efforts to monitor glaciers in IRIN Asia.

 

Austrian and Swiss Alps look back at their history…way, way back

“The landscapes in mountain regions are often strongly influenced by the steep climatic gradients and by past variations in climatic conditions. Therefore, the study of geological landscape features such as moraines, landslides and rock glaciers with appropriate geochronological approaches allows insights into past variations in climate.”

Read the full study in the July 8, 2014 issue of Quaternary Science Reviews.

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